29 Comments

  1. As an Addictions Counsellor I read your book with interest. I think it will be useful for many clients I work with. What would make it more legit would be if you could add references throughout the book/website. I would be interested to read the science behind your arguments/statements.

    On a personal note, I am not a problem drinker or dependent on alcohol, however reading your book has made me question why I drink at all and has me thinking about stopping for good!

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    1. Thank you, I am working on adding the scientific references to the website. It there is any area you are particularly interested in let me know and I will prioritise.

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  2. A while back I read a book called rational recovery. This reminds me of that book. AA may work for alot of people but I found the shaming poem the announce at every meeting annoying..that if AA doesn’t help them they have some terrible defective personality. Kind of offensive

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  3. I have read your book and found it immensely helpful, I am nearly three months alcohol free and find my biggest problem is the “fear of missing out”. Over the years of drinking I have developed a few different social groups that involves some quite heavy drinking friends. I really enjoy the friendship of quite a few of these people even though I know its through a false alcohol induced environment.
    I have continued to meet some of these groups but it has usually ended up quite an awkward feeling for either me or them. This seems to be the be the biggest problem I’m left with. How did you cope with this?
    Thanks
    Clive

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    1. Hello Clive,

      I had a similar thing. All of my friends were heavy drinkers, this is understandable, when you drink a lot you tend to spend time with other heavy drinkers. I find spending time with them now less enjoyable. The first hour or so is good, but as the drink starts to kick in and they start to repeat themselves and appear more and more drunk I find it boring. So I just leave. I find naturally I tend to spend more time with people who don’t drink, or don’t drink very much, it’s not a conscious decision it’s just something I’ve found happened naturally. It’s a shame in a way but every change, even a positive one, can involve an acclimatising period as things fall into place. I would say if you want to see your old friends then do so, if you find it awkward or unpleasant then don’t. Fortunately things are slowly changing and it is becoming more and more common for people not to drink. I’m not sure where you are based but there are quite a few articles appearing in the press about how attitudes to drinking are changing in the UK. I’ve posted a few links on the Alcohol Explained Facebook page. Just remember the problem hasn’t been caused by your stopping drinking, it’s been caused by drinking itself.

      Reply

      1. Hi William,
        I guess I’ve sort of fallen on a way of trying to resolve the problem in the way you describe, I still meet my old drinking friends just not as often and like you say I tend to go early, I’ve also joined more groups that don’t involve drinking. I think I’m may just be being too impatient and I didn’t expect the social aspect to be my biggest problem.
        Thanks for your reply, I’ll take a look at your Facebook page and the links you mention.

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  4. Hi, my relative sent me the link to your site & I have had my first read. I wouldn’t say I am an alcoholic in any way but I am more than aware that I am a heavy drinker that has, over the past year suffered ‘blackouts’ on too many occasions where I have literally lost all control of myself & been very out of character. This has been distressing after the event(s) and making me want to rectify it. I am a small build person and for the first time in my life I have put weight on, about a stone, which I put solely down to alcohol misuse. I find social pressure of needing to or being expected to drink with friends very difficult to deal with and admit I find it very easy to need a drink in my hand at all times. There is a great deal of logic in everything I have read and has helped me to have a better understanding. I hope to turn myself around before spiralling further & being caught up in the social pressures etc.

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    1. Hello, I hope you find Alcohol Explained helps you. If after reading it you are still struggling with the social side it might be worth having a look at Jason Vale’s book ‘Kick the Drink’, he does a very good job of building up confidence to deal with social situations.

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  5. Hi William,
    I read your book in early December and I haven’t drank since. I’ve tried giving up many times, even for a year once and every time it was a sacrifice. That’s the difference, this time it is not a sacrifice. I hate the idea of drinking again. It has been almost easy! I’m so happy not to be drinking, I was afraid that life would be boring but the truth is that drinking for me was a real nightmare. Thanks for sharing this wisdom and helping me overcome by biggest obstacle to being happy, free and me!

    Reply

    1. Hi Kate,

      I’m so pleased Alcohol Explained helped you so much, thank you for taking the time to leave feedback.

      Happy New Year!

      William Porter

      Reply

    2. Sounds like me too. I’m in my mid-50s and I was a regular Drinker since I was 23. Which means every single night. As the years went on it was longer and more intense drinking. I tried to stop many times the longest being 3 months 10 years ago. When I started reading this book and understanding what was going on I too felt like it was no longer a sacrifice to give it up I wanted to give it up! This is the one thing that I really appreciate that works for me from this book. I don’t long to drink again I know what it’s been doing to me and I hate it. I think Mr Porter for providing the information at least a preview of it for free. Without it I would have never read the information and would have been struggling with this even more so.

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  6. Hi William,
    For many years I tried to stop drinking. The break lasted for some weeks, once even for 8 months. Every time I started again on a social event like for instance X-mas, thinking it was more social and that I could manage drinking only one glass.
    This was obviously not the case so it started all over.
    By reading your book I understood how alcohol works on your body. And for the first time in my life I got convinced I really had to stop completely and also that I could stop if I wanted to.
    You convinced me that in alcohol there is nothing positive.
    As a matter of fact, I stopped drinking completely when I was half way in your book.
    Probably because I am utterly convinced of the negative sides of alcohol I almost don’t suffer cravings.
    As drinking becomes a habit, especially the choice of what you choose to drink. So I prepared myself on what I would have liked to drink instead of alcoholic drinks. It took me quite some time but I considered it quite important. The answer was difficult to define but I succeeded to choose two warm drinks that I would have liked and two cold ones (described in my mind into the smallest detail so I would not have to think when I wanted to take a drink).
    So whenever I have to choose, I have my answer ready.
    Now, without alcohol, I feel much better. I feel more secure of myself, am more relaxed and see things more clearly than I used to.
    I do not intend to take anymore alcohol in my life. It is not worth it!
    I do must thank you because this major change became possible only by reading your book. It describes clearly the process of how alcohol works once it gets in your body.
    I never got this information before. The reality is just staggering and convinces to quit as soon as possible if you are drinking but also not to start ever if you didn’t drink any alcohol until then. Your book should be read by young (children) and old in order to spread your knowledge on the subject.
    Thank you very much. You changed my life.
    Myriam

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    1. Thank you Myriam, I’m glad you found the knowledge inhibited the cravings, i found the same which was the main driving force to write the book, in case that knowledge could also help others.

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  7. I’ve just finished your book for the first time and will read again. I’m so glad I bought it as it all makes perfect sense to me and I’m hoping this will be the last time I have to give up alcohol. I’m on my second day two because I chose to have an evening taking in everything that happened during and after I drank. I was gutted that I did the next morning but I’m on the path now. I know AA wouldn’t work for me as I have no religious beliefs and think scientifically. Also knowing what I know about alcohol I would actually feel angry about being shamed for falling into its grip. Anyway, thank you for writing this, I’ll be starting my second read through later.

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    1. You may have done it the best way, a lot of people find drinking while reading the book / shortly after finishing it helps cement what’s in it in the mind. I hope this is how it works for you.

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  8. Many thanks for a logical, well structured and very informative book. I found this very useful in my quest to give up alcohol. I am now at 69 days and ploughing on. I would be grateful if you could write a second book on PAWS. I have struggled through some weird patches and some very difficult patches. I can fully understand why the relapse rate is so high. My efforts to research this phase of recovery have produced frustratingly little meaningful information. Your talents would be appreciated by many I am sure.

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    1. Thank you I’ll give it some thought. I’m not sure there’s a whole book in it but a blog post maybe.

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  9. I felt compelled to leave a comment on this site. As others have said; having read this book I now have the final part of the puzzle that I need to truly desire both consciously and subconsciously to quit drinking for good. I hadn’t heard of cognitive dissonance until I read This Naked Mind by Annie Grace, but it wasn’t until you explained the biological part ( what goes on inside us chemically ) that I finally felt deep within me that drinking is something that no longer serves me. It truly has always taken more than it has ever given.
    I’m the sort of person that tries to be very healthy, doing intermittent fasting, eating gut healthy foods and whole real food as much as possible. Yet every weekend I drank red wine (heart health right?) couldn’t stop at one or two…… and ended up eating as much sugar and junk as I could cram in at the end of the night. I couldn’t understand why I did this every Friday and Saturday night, why I couldn’t moderate. Your book gave me the answers. What sealed the deal was realising the terrible physical impact the alcohol I was drinking was wreaking on my body. Why would I do that knowing what I know? I WON’T!!!
    The final thing that I am finding so useful is the strategies you suggest for dealing with those celebrations and old typical drinking events. Thank you so much for your wonderful life changing book. I have left a 5 star review on Amazon and will certainly recommend this book to my still heavy drinking friends.

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  10. Hi William
    I bought your book after trying and failing to read Annie Grace. Your book has grabbed me by the shirt collars and given me a bit of a head wobble. In a good way of course. I have always had drink issues from a young age, 15 years old I started this awful road and how I wish I hadn’t. My subconscious had a very firm grip on me telling me a drink the next day will sort me out and I can carry on just fine. Ignore the sleepless nights and feeling wretched and awful because that drink always helped at the end of the day. Oh and at the weekend I can start at 11.00 as that’s fine isn’t it? Any way I gave up for 2 years and was happy and slept, lost weight and life was good. And then I thought I could maybe have a drink. Big mistake as my drinking spiralled again over 3 years until here I am again. I truly believe after your book I have the tools to stop for life.

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  11. I just finished re-reading the last several chapters of your book. I am assembling my tool box so I can stop drinking again, once and for all. My fear of withdrawal is about equal to my fear of drinking and it is hellish. Alcohol is about the most insidious fiend / substance that I can think of.
    After 20 years not drinking, I questioned whether I truly had a problem and decided there was only one way to find out.
    I do not recommend this. I will attest to the fact that one picks up where one left off in an amazingly short period of time. The fog of denial whispers convincingly it’s not *that* bad. Until it just is.
    I look forward to being comfortable in my own skin again. Your book resonates and tells the truth. Thank you.

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  12. Good morning mr. Porter, I got your book on Audible. I listen to the whole thing in one sitting. And now I have gone back and digesting it chapter by chapter. It is quite frankly life changing. I have been an alcoholic for well over 30 years. I’ve had DUIs divorces. You name it I’ve lived through it. Let’s just call it a living nightmare. Ironically I’ve done very well for myself in life. I’ve had a great career, 2 great kids. A lot of money in the bank. And actually semi retiring at the age of 55. So life is good. Or it should be. Actually started blogging to myself. As I’ve been trying to stop drinking. I call it hitting rock top. Because even when you are on top of the world, you have nothing to drink for, but you’re sure damn find a reason. That’s where your book came in to save me. I have read Annie Grace’s book, and Jason veils and they were both very helpful. But yours like others have said period is straightforward, and very factual. I mean the bottom line is, if we take that first drink, will chase that feeling with another drink, and another. That’s really what I needed to hear. So simple, yet so life-changing. All of your other chapters are equally informative and helpful. Sometimes you just need to hear something in a certain way for that light bulb to click. I thank you for quite frankly changing my life. I am hopeful, more than I ever have been. No AA meetings, I do like the social aspect of them. As in your website. It would be nice to have a group of like-minded people to discuss this book with. That is my Hope anyway. Because I never want f a b to rear its ugly head. Thank you kind sir, you have changed my life. And for that I can never thank you enough!

    Reply

    1. Thank you! I love the concept of ‘hitting rock top’. I think is true for many people, many people are living a nightmare but are still managing to keep things together from a family / work perspective.

      If you are on Facebook then there is an Alcohol Explained group which is now nearing 400 members. It would be good to ‘see’ you there.

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  13. Wow. Like Timothy, I consumed this book in one go. I started drinking when I was 14 (had the ‘epiphany’, lost all social awkwardness) and spent the next three decades teaching my subconscious some bad lessons. I have struggled with cognitive dissonance around drinking since my early 20s. Drinking has made me more miserable than I can even say. I consider myself an intelligent, thoughtful, critical thinker and yet I could never solve this problem for myself. I am blessed in many ways, and from the outside (to most people) would look like I totally have my shit together. But no. I have read everything, watched everything, tried everything – nothing has really stuck. Until now. Your book is exactly what I needed, it describes exactly the path and thought processes I have travelled over many years. Seeing it in black and white is like the floodlight being turned onto the shadows. I am pretty confident that the tables have been turned, that now I know exactly what I am dealing with, the choice to not drink feels like – well, a choice, not a punishment or an unreachable nirvana. I simply can not thank you enough.

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  14. Hello Mr. Porter,
    thank you so much for this book. After 15 years of daily drinking I could finally stop and I feel so good about this choice.
    There is just one question left that maybe you have the answer to:
    How come that (in one evening) the more we drink the faster we drink and the more important every drink becomes? I was drinking like that and now I see others do it: First drink “normal”, second drink too, third a little faster, fourth even faster and the fifth (or tenth) glass of wine is drunk in one go. When you try to tell the person it is enough, he/she gets angry and this last glass becomes the most important thing on earth. (After the second/third it wouldn’t have been that important.)
    It would be great if you could tell me something about this phenomenon.

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  15. Hi
    I have just finished your book and it’s wonderful
    I have needed the straight forward practical information you have supplied – so thank you I am going to begin to get my self fully sober and look forward to getting my life back under control
    Louise

    Reply

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